From home improvement to self-improvement: El Camino lumberjack classes as a moving TV producer

A lidded container in progress with the top still needing to be sliced off is displayed inside the El Camino woodworking workshop on Wednesday, Nov. 29. This project was made by El Camino woodworking student Daniela Romero.  (Juan Garcia

His love and appreciation of the craft of woodworking began as a construction worker watch.

Sabrina Mar was working as a television producer on a show called “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” When it was engineered by construction workers to build things for the show.

Mar El Camino College student is a student of cabinet making and cleaning services. It is one of many that displays wood in the El Camino Schauerman Library.

The work went on sale on Tuesday, November 28.

A covered container in progress with the top still cut off is shown inside an El Camino carpentry workshop on Wednesday, Nov. 29. This project was done by El Camino student Daniela Romero. (Juan Garcia | The Union)

Before deciding to study fine arts, Mar had worked alongside carpenters for years, having a history of working for Home and Garden television shows and home improvement shows.

“I always thought I could see myself doing all this,” Mar said. “And so at first I started as a hobby, then I decided that I really liked it and I wanted to continue taking classes.”

Mar was enrolled at El Camino College, where she initially “took” and “took” classes until she officially became part of the 2022 program and decided to get her degree.

As a formal part woodworking class Mar has the opportunity to submit and exhibit his work at the Schauerman Library.

Daniela Romero, a student at Camino El Camino College, holds her first covered container while in class among El Camino woodworkers setting up a wood workshop on Wednesday, Nov. 29.
Daniela Romero, a student at Camino El Camino College, holds her first covered container while in class among El Camino woodworkers setting up a wood workshop on Wednesday, Nov. 29.

Jack Selph, a distinguished professor of wood and cabinet making, has been in his field for 43 years and helped start the library’s work on the woodwork exhibition.

Selph is Mar’s construction technology professor and the one who encouraged her to join the show.

Selph said the idea of ​​presenting student work in the library was because her students didn’t have to come to display their work.

“It encourages them. (Showing work) gives them a sense of accomplishment,” Selph said. “They can be excited when things are there.”

A library of artists exhibiting each year, with a student showcase board.long history” within the Library, according to Outreach Services Librarian Camilla Jenkin.

Jenkin has been in his role for five years, coordinating the library’s events and assisting with the program and exhibits, including “La Feria de las Flores” a collaboration between the Art Gallery and the Schauerman Library.

The library lobby has been used to showcase art from the local community, although for the past few years ECC student and faculty work has been the focus of exhibitions.

Jenkin said the library is looking to “really showcase El Camino.”

“I think it’s important that we have that kind of pride,” Jenkin said. “We’re our own little community at El Camino, and you know we’re definitely the South Bay, but sometimes it’s just nice that we’re doing it alone.”

El Camino College student Ena Dubnoff works on her pottery in woodworking class on Wednesday, Nov.  29. Here Dubnoff prepares to start turning one of his bowls on the lathe.  (Juan Garcia | The Union)
El Camino College student Ena Dubnoff works on her pottery in woodworking class on Wednesday, Nov. 29. Here Dubnoff prepares to start turning one of his bowls on the lathe. (Juan Garcia | The Union)

Exhibiting artwork is an opportunity for students to not only show their work, but to showcase it, Selph said. Prices for the handmade pieces range from $5 to $350 with all profits going directly to the students.

The exhibit is “very popular” among students, faculty and staff as they come in to do their holiday shopping and buy wood as gifts.

Mar said he takes pride in displaying his work and sharing his skills with other students and the overall college community.

“Heritage has been such a big deal to me that I want everyone to know about it,” Mar said. “When you see other people’s work, it kind of shows you that those are great ideas of things that I could do or could do.”

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